Am I Complete?

When I say that having children isn’t a priority for me right now. People will often tell me that I am not “complete” until I have kids.

Let me tell you this: I am complete. I do not need a husband or children to make me a complete human being. I am complete. God created me complete.

My reason for existence isn’t for my husband or for my children. There is only one reason for my existence.

To worship Allah.

And I did not create the jinn and mankind except to worship Me alone. (Quran 51:56)

Yes, children are a blessing but not everyone will have children. Does that mean those women have incomplete lives than those who have children?

It does not.

People are more than capable of living happily both with and without children. They can also be miserable with or without children. It really depends on how you look at it.

I am happy without children in my life right now. I am happy focusing on my marriage, my career, my health. This notion of being complete once you’re married with children needs to stop.

We should be teaching the youth that they are complete in and of themselves. That they should find themselves before they get married before they have children.

Because getting married or having a child is not a cure for completeness or happiness.

There are many examples of women who lived happy, complete lives; some were married, some were not. Some had children and some did not. The Mothers of the Believers are prime examples of living complete lives even though they didn’t have children.

No-one made them feel as though they were less because they didn’t have children, they weren’t continually told that they NEED to have children. They were celebrated for all that they did and achieved in life.

Maybe we should learn to mind our business and not tell girls and women these toxic messages that to be “complete” they need to get married or have kids. Everyone will have a different path in life and not everyone’s path will include marriage and children.

There are so many reasons as to why women don’t have children some because of a health condition which makes it dangerous or impossible, some out of choice.

Who are we to decide that they need to have children?

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The Lines We Cross Book Review

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*Contains mild spoilers*

The Lines We Cross by Randa Abdel-Fattah is set in Australia and follows the story of Mina and Michael. Mina is an Afghani-Australian who had arrived in Australia as a refugee as a young child. Michael comes from a family whose parents are opposed to allowing Muslim refugees into the country.

It is told from both their points of view so we get to see the story unforld from both their perspectives. Mina is given a scholarship to attend a private school and this is where their paths cross. It causes them to think and reflect on what they have grown up being told as the truth.

I really loved this book! Not only was it a great story but the message is incredibly important. As this topic is relevant no matter where you live in the world. We all hear about how refugees are trying to escape their war torn country and are trying to get their family to safety.we hear how some want to help and others are opposed to allowing them to enter. It shows all these differing opinions through Mina and Michael and their friends and family.

Although this story has a romance that develops between Mina and Michael after they initially dislike each other. Their developing feelings for each other is what furthers the story but the political issues that are interwoven into the story which also creates obstacles for them, makes it a much deeper and compelling story.

The character development for Michael was so great, he starts off as a teenager who just goes along with whatever his parents say, blindly believing them but by the end he has learnt to reflect and think deeply for himself. My main issue was with Mina’s character development where I feel there wasn’t as much development for her. I feel her main purpose was to show Michael that his beliefs may not be correct.

I also loved the friendships in this especially between Mina and Paula. It balances the serious issues with more lighthearted topics. There’s a scene where they have a LoTR marathon including cosplaying as the characters. It was such a fun scene and I loved that they were slightly nerdy.

I would definitely recommend everyone reading this book. Not only is the message so important it’s such a great book to read. I read it in two evenings. I couldn’t put the book down!

Rating: 4.5/5

If you do read it let me know what you think!

What Would my Mates Think?

What Would My Mates Think?
Paul, from the UK, had been an Islamophobe. But when life took a turn for the worst, an increase in spirituality ignited his interest in Islam. But how would his friends react if he embraced it?

Be inspired by Paul’s short interview and share it to inspire others.

check out http://www.overcome.tv

Would Islam Affect My Cultures?

Would Islam Affect My Cultures?
Isa, originally from Colombia, was impressed by the knowledge of God that young Muslims had. And he liked how Islam encouraged questions, whilst his previous faith discouraged them.

But could he make the changes Islam asked of him? And would Islam be compatible with his British / Colombian culture?

Be inspired by Isa’s short interview and share it to inspire others.

From Rastafarianism to Islam

From Rastafarianism to Islam
When traditional Christianity proved confusing, Serrant from Jamaica became a Rastafarian. But he always felt something was missing… until someone gave him a Quran.

Be inspired by Serrant’s short interview and share it to inspire others.

Make sure you check out http://www.overcome.tv for more inspiring stories

The Hate U Give Book Review

Hey guys so I wanted to share a book with you all that I read recently called The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas.

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To say I loved this book is an understatement! This book is a YA contemporary book inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement.

It is a brutally honest, heartbreaking book but is something that is so needed in today’s society. It was inspiring, insightful and empowering for all those who read it.

We all know what is happening in America regarding the Black Lives Matter movement and this explains everything so well. It follows a 16 year old girl called Starr who witnesses a police officer shoot her friend Khalil. From that we see from her point of view the way people react, how it’s portrayed in the media and what she and her family go through in the aftermath of this event.

The characters are so relatable and well fleshed out that you can’t help but feel for them and being muslim I can totally relate to so much of this book. There are assumptions and prejudices made about me because I wear I cover my hair. People think I’m uneducated, just there to serve my oppressive husband or even that I am a terrorist. But I’m none of those things but there are people who never see who I am because they never look past the scarf on my head. And like Starr I feel I can’t truly be me in front of certain people.

This book discusses police brutality, it discusses the oppression and prejudice that black people face and so much more. It is an eye opening read and I recommend everyone to read this book.

*This part is a bit spoilery*

One part of the book which really stood out for me was a conversation between Starr and her dad about why her friend was shot. Another part which was so well written was how people dehumanised her friend because he was suspected of being a drug dealer so in many people’s eyes it was justified. There are so many important scenes in this book, another part is how Starr is conflicted between how much she fears the police and the fact that her uncle is a police officer.

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I also had the pleasure of meeting the author Angie Thomas at a book signing and she is honestly such a lovely person. This book is something so close to her heart as she grew up in a similar environment to the main character of the book and she wants more people to widen their perspectives. This was her way of fighting the oppression.

The only part of the book I didn’t like was the swearing, it’s a personal preference that is something I dislike in all books.

If you have read this book do let me know what you think!

What’s the point of having a voice if you’re gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn’t be?

When a 16 year old embraces Islam…

When a 16 year old embraces Islam…
At 16, Nisha from the UK finally found the confidence to proclaim herself a Muslim.

Be inspired by Nisha’s short interview and share it to inspire others.

Check out other videos at: http://www.overcome.tv